The Avengers International Fan Forum Forum Index The Avengers International Fan Forum

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

The Eagle's Nest Review
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Avengers International Fan Forum Forum Index -> The Avengers on Television
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Timeless A-Peel
A Touch of Brimstone


Joined: 31 Aug 2008
Posts: 4866
Location: New Scotland, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 2008 8:23 am    Post subject: The Eagle's Nest Review Reply with quote

Because of TAF shutting down, I never got to post my Eagle's Nest review, and as some people have shown some interest, I'm posting it here (please let me know if I've chosen the wrong section, or if it shouldn't be posted at all!)

Anyway, I wanted to focus a little less on the "this scene was good/that one not so much" sort of review because lots of people have done that already, and better, for most episodes. So this one sort of leads off my thinking on the series, the characters, and if I get to write other reviews, sort of gives a starting point. Hopefully it's of interest.

(And I know it's long. I can't help it. I've always been wordy).

The Eagle’s Nest

by J. Ferguson

Before we get into the meat of the review, it’s probably best to get one thing straight--I love The New Avengers. A lot. And I’ve seen all the episodes of the series so many times it’d be impossible to write a review that’s anything but biased. So this review (and any future ones I’ll, hopefully, churn out) will be written from a fan’s viewpoint. That doesn’t mean to say that I’m blinded to the series’ flaws, but while there’s something to love about every New Avengers (or Avengers) episode, I’ll try and judge what are the best examples in the series’ repertoire, showcasing what it does best, and which ones are middling or worse. And what better place to begin than the beginning?

The Eagle’s Nest was the first episode of the new show, both to be shot and broadcast. Reviews were favourable, and it’s not hard to see why. It has a great opening sequence that draws you in from the start—vintage Avengers, we see a man fleeing for his life, pursued by adversaries brandishing…fishing rods? The pre-credit sequence and freeze-frame concept is an improvement on the formula of the original series, where the credits preceded the action. Now we get a teaser, a hook, to whet our appetite, and then the credits keep us in suspense as we wait for the follow-up. We know from the start that Stannard will die, just as so many did in the early moments of the original series. The only question is how. The monks, meanwhile, are wonderfully sinister, and turning them on their heads from providers of sanctuary to Stannard’s captors and murderers is very Avengers.

In fact, the script is peppered with Avengerous touches, the sort of fan-pleasing moments that make you clap your hands and bounce with glee. There are too many to mention. Steed doffs his bowler so many times in his conversation with the old lady at the start it borders on the ridiculous. Purdey continues the informal tradition of Avengers girls donning fur in their premiere episode. Steed and his plethora of luggage echo “The Girl from Auntie.” O’Hara and Purdey’s exchange call to mind many meetings between Emma or Tara and a similar eccentric. Purdey’s green pseudo-Emmapeeler. And, my personal favourite, Steed’s steel-crowned bowler brought back into service with a bang! But while it’s marvelous to have in-jokes, in some ways I don’t think this does TNA any favours. Reviews were certainly positive, touting TNA as no different than its forebear (namely the Emma/Tara seasons), and on this evidence, that seems to be true. Clearly this episode was constructed to call up fond memories of the original, to try and reassure old fans that this is their show, revived but unsullied by the passage of time, but this doesn’t give the viewer an accurate picture of assessment of what the show would ultimately be like. TNA was always aware of its ancestry, and one of its assets was its ability to draw upon that long and rich history for the occasional winking reference, or to twist old stories and motifs to fit its style. Ignoring the past would have been a mistake. But here Brian Clemens has gone overboard, and as such TNA won’t truly establish its own identity until the next episode, which may have been a bit jarring to viewers who tuned in next week for more of the same.

The problem spills over to the character balance as well. Patrick Macnee’s claims that Steed had been put out to pasture were always unfounded, but here in particular he has amsolutely nothing to complain about. Calling back memories of the old days, Steed is paired with Purdey throughout much of the episode, leaving Gambit to follow his own line of inquiry, making it difficult to see them as a team. This may have been intentional, however, as Steed’s visit to Stannard implies that he is now in charge of a bevy agents, of which Gambit is one, none of whom qualify as a partner the way Emma and company did. While Gambit and Steed have clearly worked together before, Purdey seems familiar with Gambit, but not Steed, who has yet to see her in action. In that case such a pairing is forgivable. By the end, we have the brilliant closing sequence with Purdey and Gambit flanking their leader, all three striding off, whistling, a team now. This actually gives us a sense of progression, and also serves as one of the most iconic scenes of the series.

But the more pressing problem with “Eagle’s” is it feels like a pilot, particularly in regards to the new characters, Purdey and Gambit. Where Emma, Cathy, and Tara’s introductory episodes were shot well into filming, Purdey and Gambit’s first transmitted story was also the first to be filmed, and as such it’s that much more obvious that Gareth and Joanna are still feeling their way along in their characters and the way they interact. Actors are often somewhat stiff when they start with a new character, and both do very well for a first try. But as a result, the Purdey/Gambit bedroom scene, clearly meant to set up the pair’s banter and flirtatious relationship, doesn’t spark the way it would later on in the series. It does give us some wonderful bits, though, Gareth’s fond smile through the curtains, and his abrupt wake-up call among them, both of which are wonderfully played by Gareth.

On an individual front, Gambit’s character floats between two extremes in this episode, almost bouncy in his first scene with Purdey, then exceptionally brutal and ruthless in his first fight scene. It is in the latter that he echoes the harder-edged Steed from the Gale era. After the first few episodes of the show, Gambit’s hard edges were noticeably toned down, but that first fight and Gambit’s subsequent interrogation of the man (even the way he manhandles his victim after he takes a poison capsule) is unusually harsh for the show. While the audience is never left in any doubt as to what Gambit is capable of, by the fourth episode he’ll rarely be seen as quite this cold and unforgiving. Gambit would always been the hard man of the bunch, but clearly someone decided that it was necessary to tone down this aspect of the character, whether for the censors or because it was too sharp a contrast with his light-hearted relationship with Purdey. Gambit is also portrayed as the consummate professional, following procedure and conducting his investigation with great efficiency, even warding off the attentions of his German admirer until the job at hand is complete. This aspect of Gambit would be more lasting.

Purdey, meanwhile, is played as young and wide-eyed, in awe of Steed, to the point of confessing that she had defended him to Gambit’s assertion that Steed was “old-fashioned” (indicating a less-than-sanguine association between the men reminiscent of the Keel era), and wondering at his clever method of escape (a classic Steed moment that would have been at home in the best of the Peel episodes). But most notable is the way she blushes when Steed insinuates that she was involved with Stannard, and shoots Gambit a warning look to as if to say ‘don’t get the wrong idea.’ She also waits for Gambit’s departure before disclosing her more intimate knowledge regarding the missing agent. This isn’t the self-assured Purdey who later would openly rhapsodize about other men just to get a rise out of Gambit. Here she’s still not confident enough to know how to play the situation. Only her ongoing love affair with food (here steak au poivre) and her fighting style are consistent with how she’ll appear later on. On a side note, it’s such a pity most of Purdey’s first major fight is clearly performed by a double, something else TNA would improve upon later on.

So while there are priceless moments (Steed’s “Rule Britannia”) and the plot is wonderfully sinister and perhaps one of the best of the series, this isn’t the best package TNA has to offer. We’re still in pilot mode. The characters aren’t there. The new identity isn’t there. This serves as a good introduction, and that’s exactly what it is—an introduction. The best is yet to come.

3 out of 4.
_________________
Last Watched: Who Was That Man I Saw You With?



Anew: A TNA Site. Updated 4/30/14
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
cyberrich
Site Admin


Joined: 05 Sep 2008
Posts: 1139
Location: Midlands, U.K.

PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 2008 9:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting review. Almost as long as the novelisation! Must have taken you an age. Sorry you don't think it's one of the best though, as I absolutely love this episode, and consider it a close runner-up to Target. I don't feel TNA reached the heights of these two episodes enough. A lot of season 2 episodes seemed faily routine and could have been from any tv show of the 70s. What made the Avengers so special, and I include New Avengers here, was its quirkiness and its surreal plotlines. I wish there could have been many more seasons of TNA of the same quality as the first 13 episodes, but it wasn't to be. There wasn't a wasted frame in Eagle's nest. I never tire of this one. I'll give it 5 stars out of 5.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Timeless A-Peel
A Touch of Brimstone


Joined: 31 Aug 2008
Posts: 4866
Location: New Scotland, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cyberrich wrote:
Interesting review. Almost as long as the novelisation! Must have taken you an age. Sorry you don't think it's one of the best though, as I absolutely love this episode, and consider it a close runner-up to Target. I don't feel TNA reached the heights of these two episodes enough. A lot of season 2 episodes seemed faily routine and could have been from any tv show of the 70s. What made the Avengers so special, and I include New Avengers here, was its quirkiness and its surreal plotlines. I wish there could have been many more seasons of TNA of the same quality as the first 13 episodes, but it wasn't to be. There wasn't a wasted frame in Eagle's nest. I never tire of this one. I'll give it 5 stars out of 5.


Thanks for taking the time to read it! I think how you rate an episode depends on what you're looking for from it. Me, I'm big on the character interaction. A good plot is nice, too, but if Steed and his partner aren't clicking or doing much except wandering around gathering clues, then all the plot in the world won't make the episode a stand-out. Eagle's has one of TNA's quirkiest plots, this is true, but you can still feel everyone finding their feet too much much for me to think it's "the best" TNA has to offer in terms of its characters and mood. Happily, it did that pretty fast!
_________________
Last Watched: Who Was That Man I Saw You With?



Anew: A TNA Site. Updated 4/30/14
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Rodney
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As so often I think Cyberrich is spot on. The Eagle's Nest is vintage Avengers because while a new creation it also drew on classic Avengers characteristics. I too love the opening sequence and the quality of the script is first class, like Target, Cat Among the Pigeons and some others among the first 13. The second mini-season contains far too many shoddily made episodes. It wasn't simply the cash problems or leaving the UK for pastures new - though both of these were problematic issues. If the quality of the first 13 (plus Dead Men Are Dangerous) could have been maintained then who knows. As it was there were too many lows after that to warrant a second batch of 26, even if the money had been there. Others disagree, I know, but I think that sentiment gets in the way of critical objectivity sometimes.
Back to top
Frankymole
A Touch of Brimstone


Joined: 01 Sep 2008
Posts: 4065
Location: Carmadoc research establishment

PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 2008 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

An excellent review, thanks for taking the plunge in writing it, and now posting it!

I'm torn about whether the "pilot" episode should be shown first or later in a series. In some ways, if relationships are still being developed, I'd rather get that initial awkwardness over quickly. That saves having a slightly weird 'step backwards'-feeling episode later on. Of course it would have been a lot more logical if we were told (or saw) that Gambit and Purdey had only recently started working together, perhaps recently assigned to Steed. We could have had the same type of "exploring each others limits" that their alter egos got in "Faces".
_________________
Last watched: The Man in the Mirror.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Artanis
Have Fingers... Will Type!


Joined: 02 Sep 2008
Posts: 259
Location: USA

PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 2008 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Terrific review, Timeless! I just recently watched the "Eagle's Nest" and that was my first time seeing The New Avengers. I thought it was a very good episode and a great introduction to the show. The plot had that Avengers feel to it and the episode included a lot of the quirkiness from the original show. Plus, it was nice to see Peter Cushing again. I rate it a 9/10. Smile
_________________
Allen
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Timeless A-Peel
A Touch of Brimstone


Joined: 31 Aug 2008
Posts: 4866
Location: New Scotland, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2008 7:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frankymole wrote:
An excellent review, thanks for taking the plunge in writing it, and now posting it!

I'm torn about whether the "pilot" episode should be shown first or later in a series. In some ways, if relationships are still being developed, I'd rather get that initial awkwardness over quickly. That saves having a slightly weird 'step backwards'-feeling episode later on. Of course it would have been a lot more logical if we were told (or saw) that Gambit and Purdey had only recently started working together, perhaps recently assigned to Steed. We could have had the same type of "exploring each others limits" that their alter egos got in "Faces".


Thanks! Fingers crossed I'll do some more one of these days (I'm swamped this weekend, but who knows about the next?).

It is hard to know where to stick "the pilot," because it doesn't give the audience a very good indicator of the characters, but avoids a "backstep" in the process. I remember it did strike me as a little odd watching The Murder Market after Town of No Return, what with Diana Rigg pitching Emma's voice to be softer, and the very jarring Cathy-like argument she has with Steed. Much the way Honor's first go has her smiling all the time before they told her she'd be out of a job if she kept it up. What I think makes Eagle's so obvious is because it was so obviously constructed as the pilot, and it was first to be shot. So on top of Gareth and Joanna's first crack at the Purdey/Gambit banter we've got "first reveal" scenes, so obviously meant to introduce us to the characters one by one that they may as well stick a big arrow on the screen with "STEED," "GAMBIT," or "PURDEY" beside it (much the same way Emma lifting off her mask in Town or Tara poking round the corner in The Forget-Me-Not are similarly meant to set up a new character). I'm not saying this a bad thing--TNA was a new show, not another season of the old one, so there's more of a need to set everything up. But it's also got the grand location filming in Scotland and other generous budget allocations so common in pilots. It makes a big splash, and it's certainly enjoyable, but over and over I find that often the rest of the episodes never quite sync up to it the way. The pilot is a different breed. I'm not saying I dislike the episode by any stretch of the imagination, but if it had been shot later, with more of the character touches that would later define the show, I think it'd work even better.

Oh, and I like your idea of defining the Purdey/Gambit relationship in a Faces-like way. The show's never been big on the exposition--you sort of piece things together as things go along. But whenever all three of them are in a room, there's a tendency for Purdey to fall into the background a bit--she spends a lot of time looking from one to the other while Steed and Gambit rattle off the dialogue, and she squirms away all through the scenes in Stannard's apartment until Gambit leaves. It's like she can handle them one-on-one, but doesn't do so well with both at once, which kind of hints she's the new addition. (I mean, Steed's never seen her fight. She hasn't figured out Gambit's not prep school material.) It would've made more sense to point her out as the newbie. As it is, we don't see as much of her slightly pushy confidence from later on.

Quote:
Terrific review, Timeless! I just recently watched the "Eagle's Nest" and that was my first time seeing The New Avengers. I thought it was a very good episode and a great introduction to the show. The plot had that Avengers feel to it and the episode included a lot of the quirkiness from the original show. Plus, it was nice to see Peter Cushing again. I rate it a 9/10.


Thank you! I'm glad you enjoyed it. I hope you have fun with the rest of TNA. And yes, Peter Cushing's a highlight of this one. I like him here better than Return of the Cybernauts. He's such a sympathetic character--you really feel for him, while some of the secondary characters didn't do much more than propel the plot. He gave Joanna her first bunch of roses for her dressing room, apparently.
_________________
Last Watched: Who Was That Man I Saw You With?



Anew: A TNA Site. Updated 4/30/14
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Philippa
The Big Thinker


Joined: 07 Sep 2008
Posts: 1381
Location: Amsterdam

PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2008 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great review.
You actually got me thinking about a lot of aspects of this episode that I hadn't considered before. I think it's definitely one of the best TNA episodes, but the few things you pointed out like Gambit's harshness and Purdey's insecurity are things that I didn't really notice before for some reason. But they seem perfectly logical now that you mention them
Still, I'd give this episode a rating of 9/10, since it's a great one and it was the first episode of The Avengers I ever saw which made me fall in love with the series Very Happy
_________________
My Joanna Lumley Fan Forum
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
Artanis
Have Fingers... Will Type!


Joined: 02 Sep 2008
Posts: 259
Location: USA

PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2008 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Thank you! I'm glad you enjoyed it. I hope you have fun with the rest of TNA. And yes, Peter Cushing's a highlight of this one. I like him here better than Return of the Cybernauts. He's such a sympathetic character--you really feel for him, while some of the secondary characters didn't do much more than propel the plot. He gave Joanna her first bunch of roses for her dressing room, apparently.


Thanks! I just finished the Cathy Gale episodes, so next is TNA. I look forward to watching the rest of the series, it seems to be a very good sequel to the original. Purdey and Gambit are great too and with Steed, they make a formidable team. Smile
_________________
Allen
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Frankymole
A Touch of Brimstone


Joined: 01 Sep 2008
Posts: 4065
Location: Carmadoc research establishment

PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2008 6:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Timeless A-Peel wrote:

Thank you! I'm glad you enjoyed it. I hope you have fun with the rest of TNA. And yes, Peter Cushing's a highlight of this one.


Talking of familiar faces, the chap who plays the lead Nazi-monk (Derek Farr?) was the fellow controlled by the alien plant in "Man-Eater of Surrey Green". I am sure there are some more doppelgangers about!
_________________
Last watched: The Man in the Mirror.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Timeless A-Peel
A Touch of Brimstone


Joined: 31 Aug 2008
Posts: 4866
Location: New Scotland, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2008 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Philippa wrote:
Great review.
You actually got me thinking about a lot of aspects of this episode that I hadn't considered before. I think it's definitely one of the best TNA episodes, but the few things you pointed out like Gambit's harshness and Purdey's insecurity are things that I didn't really notice before for some reason. But they seem perfectly logical now that you mention them
Still, I'd give this episode a rating of 9/10, since it's a great one and it was the first episode of The Avengers I ever saw which made me fall in love with the series Very Happy


Well, I've watched them a few times, so I have had quite a few chances to look for the little things. I find TNA's really good for rewatching, because if you focus away from the main action, there's often little things going on in the background, particularly if it's Gambit. Seven years later and I'm still finding stuff.

I think one of the reasons I noticed that Gambit was played "harsher" was because I saw season 2 first, and he's the butt of the jokes more often than not, so he's a little less serious. But coming around to season 1, he's infinitely more brutal for the first few episodes--actually channeling the early Steed, who was more likely to rough people up than turn on the charm. If you watch Midas Touch or House of Cards, you'll see the same thing, particularly in Cards. I was going to put this in when I did the review, but the most obvious case is where Gambit sticks Cartney's hand in the crematorium, and then we cut away before he can get a little more, er, "creative." I remember that really shocked me the first time I saw it, because for Avengerland, even NewAvengerland, that's pretty brutal. Gambit's not a sadist, but he's got his limits, and like most of the characters, if you push him past a certain point, things get very, very bad for the guy doing the pushing (some of Patrick's best acting is when Steed's eyes flicker and you just know someone's in for it). Watch those ones again and pay attention, and you'll see Gambit's got that ruthless edge to him. Then they ease off. I don't know if they were worried about the kiddies watching, or even if it was a conscious choice, but they never go that far again.

And yeah, Purdey seems very young and inexperienced in this one. She gets past it pretty fast, but every once in a while they drop a line or two that hints she's the newbie. If I ever get t iem to write more reviews, I'll point those out.

It's ironic, really, that the Gale era, which is my least favourite of the series, actually spawned a lot of TNA's style. Purdey and Gambit are essentially Steed and Cathy redux--an icey blonde who drives a motorbike, and the charming yet deadly professional male agent. Purdey's the first Avengers girl since Cathy to be shot, the plots are much more centred around betrayal within the Ministry, and even the age gap between the two leads is shrunk down to four years, similar to Patrick and Honor, compared to the 16-year gap with Emma and 25 with Tara. The differences come in when they gave Purdey a sense of humour, Gambit some morals, and made them actually like each other (I don't think Cathy likes Steed much at all, personally. She's working with him to make a difference, and as soon as she can't take it anymore, she gets out).

Oh, and 3 out of 4 isn't meant to be a "bad" score as in "75%" or anything. It's meant to indicate a very good episode, one of the best, but I have to leave some space for my "top" picks, because I love so many TNA's, I could easily have a pile of the good great ones clumped at the top, and that wouldn't really leave much in the way of wiggle room!

Quote:
Thanks! I just finished the Cathy Gale episodes, so next is TNA. I look forward to watching the rest of the series, it seems to be a very good sequel to the original. Purdey and Gambit are great too and with Steed, they make a formidable team.


I think there's lots of fun to be had if watched with an open mind. Purdey and Gambit have some wonderful scenes that I won't spoil for you--such a shame Gareth and Joanna never really worked closely together again. I hope you'll let us know what you think of the next one you watch.

Quote:
Talking of familiar faces, the chap who plays the lead Nazi-monk (Derek Farr?) was the fellow controlled by the alien plant in "Man-Eater of Surrey Green". I am sure there are some more doppelgangers about!


I'm pretty sure that is Derek Farr, although I didn't know he was in Man-Eater. There are loads of doppelgangers wandering around (not all named "Terry" and "Lolita"). Gabrielle Drake is the most obvious, and Peter Jeffrey. You can't go wrong with Peter Jeffrey! Very Happy
_________________
Last Watched: Who Was That Man I Saw You With?



Anew: A TNA Site. Updated 4/30/14
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Artanis
Have Fingers... Will Type!


Joined: 02 Sep 2008
Posts: 259
Location: USA

PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2008 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I think there's lots of fun to be had if watched with an open mind. Purdey and Gambit have some wonderful scenes that I won't spoil for you--such a shame Gareth and Joanna never really worked closely together again. I hope you'll let us know what you think of the next one you watch.


Yes, let me watch a couple of more episodes, then I'll post what I think about them. Smile
_________________
Allen
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Darren
The Bird Who Wrote Too Much


Joined: 01 Sep 2008
Posts: 1845
Location: UK

PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2008 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Timeless A-Peel wrote:

Quote:
Talking of familiar faces, the chap who plays the lead Nazi-monk (Derek Farr?) was the fellow controlled by the alien plant in "Man-Eater of Surrey Green". I am sure there are some more doppelgangers about!


I'm pretty sure that is Derek Farr, although I didn't know he was in Man-Eater. There are loads of doppelgangers wandering around (not all named "Terry" and "Lolita"). Gabrielle Drake is the most obvious, and Peter Jeffrey. You can't go wrong with Peter Jeffrey! Very Happy


Oh of course, I had never connected Derek Farr in this with Man-Eater but he was Sir Lyle Peterson. And Frank Gatliff played a few roles in the original series.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rodney
Guest





PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2008 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Perhaps the most famous re-appearances in TNA were from Ian Hendry and Peter Cushing. Cushing was excellent but Hendry was a pale shadow of his former self.
Back to top
Rodney
Guest





PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2008 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No one would pretend that Gareth Hunt was a great actor but considering how good he is with the lighter touches in the show it is a shame he didn't appear more often in situation comedies etc. TNA seemed to be the only pinnacle of achievement for him on TV.
Back to top
Dandy Forsdyke
Diabolical Mastermind


Joined: 01 Sep 2008
Posts: 5281
Location: Camberwick Green

PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2008 10:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I remember Gareth in That Beryl Marsden and one other (Side By Side), but it's true he never appeared in a long-lasting sitcom.
_________________

THE AVENGERS GALLERY
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Strange Young Man
Little Wonder


Joined: 01 Sep 2008
Posts: 110

PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 5:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great review! I think I can agree with all of your major points.

Where we differ is our preferences. To me, The Eagle's Nest is what all of The New Avengers should've been like- basically, The Avengers 2- a true successor to the original series. There are other great The New Avengers episodes (Dead Men, Tale, and Target) but to me The Eagle's Nest has the right feel and attitude. It feels like we are getting sucked back into Avengerland, but in the 70s. Now that I think about it, it doesn't even have anything obviously 70s about it apart from the score.

I just wished they were all this good and paid this much respect to the original series.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rodney
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I couldn't agree more, strange young man! It strikes the right balance between a new project and a plunge back into Avengersland. If they had all been that good then the series might have survived, despite the financial problems. Many of the 'season 2' episodes were an insult to our intelligence and Macnee was right to be embarrassed about some of them. The Eagle's Nest was top quality.
Back to top
Timeless A-Peel
A Touch of Brimstone


Joined: 31 Aug 2008
Posts: 4866
Location: New Scotland, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Strange Young Man wrote:
Great review! I think I can agree with all of your major points.

Where we differ is our preferences. To me, The Eagle's Nest is what all of The New Avengers should've been like- basically, The Avengers 2- a true successor to the original series. There are other great The New Avengers episodes (Dead Men, Tale, and Target) but to me The Eagle's Nest has the right feel and attitude. It feels like we are getting sucked back into Avengerland, but in the 70s. Now that I think about it, it doesn't even have anything obviously 70s about it apart from the score.

I just wished they were all this good and paid this much respect to the original series.


I think TNA did do a pretty job of carrying on the show--it just didn't completely follow the Emma template. I always think of TNA as having one foot in the Gale era and another in the Emmas. In fact, I think a lot of the Gale premises, particularly the Ministry centred ones that deal in betrayal and not knowing who to trust (The Nutshell and The Wringer come to mind) would have worked quite well in TNA. But some of the plots and character interactions are on the lighter side and more of an Emma touch. I'm all for a seventies Avengerland, but trying to clone it wouldn't have done anyone any good. My bottom line is TNA needed its own identity, and with Eagle's (which I love, really I do) I feel like they're trying too hard to remind us about the old show and not focussing enough on giving it its own unique take on the premise and characters, just the way every previous season got to spin the mood and the storylines its own way. By the next episode I think they've gotten it.
_________________
Last Watched: Who Was That Man I Saw You With?



Anew: A TNA Site. Updated 4/30/14
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Dandy Forsdyke
Diabolical Mastermind


Joined: 01 Sep 2008
Posts: 5281
Location: Camberwick Green

PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 12:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I may be wrong, but I always got the impression Brian Clemens had The Eagle's Nest story, in one form or another, for a few years which might account for it to be more like the previous Avengers stories than the later New Avengers episodes.
_________________

THE AVENGERS GALLERY
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Avengers International Fan Forum Forum Index -> The Avengers on Television All times are GMT - 9 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Page 1 of 5

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group. Hosted by phpBB.BizHat.com

Free Web Hosting | File Hosting | Photo Gallery | Matrimonial


Powered by PhpBB.BizHat.com, setup your forum now!
For Support, visit Forums.BizHat.com